« Back Press release 01.01.2014

Kuoreveden Sähkö switches to Aidon’s remote reading system

At the turn of the year comes into effect the regulation set in 2009 according to which, by the year 2014, 80 % of electricity meters in Finland must be remote readable devices capable of hourly-based measuring of electricity consumption.

Kuoreveden Sähkö energy company, operating in the southwest corner of Central Finland, clearly fulfils the requirement of 80 %, for almost all of its 2,350 meters in the region have already been replaced by remote readable meters. The devices as well as the necessary reading system were delivered by Jyväskylä-based Aidon Oy.

– Naturally, the most significant benefit brought by remote reading is that electricity bills for the customers will be based on actual consumption, says Tero Karhumäki, CEO at Kuoreveden Sähkö.

– In addition, the information provided by remote readable meters gives us more information on the status of the electric network, including power outages or disturbances, for instance.

The replacement of the meters which was started in March 2013 has proceeded according to plan. In addition to replacing the meters, switching to remote reading required combining the information systems, so that the data collected from the new meters can be utilised for instance in billing.

The remote reading system consists of Aidon Gateware reading software and 2,350 remote readable energy service devices, which send the measurement data into the system once a day.

For more information please contact:
Petteri Heinänen, Business Unit Director, Aidon Oy, tel. +358 40 514 4771
Tero Karhumäki, CEO, Kuoreveden Sähkö Oy, tel. +358 40 530 8899

Aidon is a leading provider of open-architecure based smart metering systems and new generation energy service devices in the Nordics. Aidon’s products serve today more than a million metering points in the Nordics. Aidon’s net sales grew to 36 million euros in 2012. Company’s annual R&D investment is ca. 10 % of the turnover. Aidon has offices in Jyväskylä and Vantaa in Finland, Täby in Sweden and Asker in Norway.